By: Amanda Garceau

Date: October 1, 2014

In an industry of creativity and competition, we easily get carried away by the desire to get it all right the first time; this is especially true when it comes to launching a website. The hard truth is that websites rarely launch in a perfect form, and for that matter, rarely reach a final state. A successful website is constantly evolving.

Between devices, apps, and games, our world today is comfortable navigating through constant updates and versions of technology. Take, for example, two of the most well-known companies in the web industry: Google and Apple.With a reputation of launching most products first as a beta version, Google allows the world a chance to use, interact, and contribute to the success of their product. Rather than making preemptive assumptions based on hypothetical users, Google uses their launch to gather true consumer analytics, a tool to help inform their second version launch.

Similarly, Apple has been known to live in perpetual beta and release products early. In doing so, they craft a specific first impression. They make an impact on the market place that demands participation and effect. In doing so, they craft a specific first impression. They make an impact on the market place that demands participation and effect.

Understandably, we as digital practitioners grow attached to our product, and, maybe, it’s time to admit that we’ve been having a blind love affair. The important thing to note is that, moving forward, perfection is relative. It’s often more important to release a functional product and begin a dialogue with the user. Post-launch, there is still room for adding features, updates, and better versions. The bonus: a website will never become stale if you acknowledge its capacity to improve.

In light of this flexibility, agencies are beginning to adopt an iterative process. The concept emphasizes a four step approach: learn, iterate, launch, repeat. The steps outline what it takes to reach a success, through maintaining an active pace and attitude, ultimately generating that relative perfection in your launch. At Subtext, we like to think of the launch day as the beginning of the project. Yes, technically, we have put in months of work to get to this point, but what counts is really all that follows.

Think of the website launch as the beginning of the project.

launch, website launch, iterative process, iterative design process